Risk Factors Diabetes Type1- Who’s most at risk?

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 21 tips you should know to live a full and healthy life with diabetes.

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Hi! We are Diabetes Consciousness; we’re here to help you find solutions towards health. 

We want to help you know better about Risk factors Diabetes Type 1. Find out how likely you’re to develop type 1 diabetes, and if you meet one or more of the following risk factors.

Risk Factors Diabetes Type 1, Who's most at risk?
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Let’s see,

It is crucial to acknowledge Diabetes T1 is linked to a predisposing genetic factor, then something in your environment triggers it. In a nutshell, this means the disease can be inherited and connected to your family history and genetics, but environmental and immunological risk factors also play a role. 

Let’s sum up some basic info; we are aware Diabetes T1 is a chronic condition that results from the pancreas’s lack or total absence of insulin production and usually occurs in childhood and adolescence, although adult cases are plenty. And so, bear in mind Insulin is a hormone that regulates blood sugar and allows glucose to enter the body’s cells to provide energy.  
 
When we talk about genetics in Diabetes, if you have the genetic marker that makes you susceptible to Diabetes T1, these genes provide instructions for making proteins that play a critical role in the immune system. Its normal function is to identify foreign substances that enter the body and defend it from them. However, in Type 1 Diabetes, this function is altered. 
 
As a result, the antigens cannot recognize their cells, which produces an “immunological error,” where the immune system attacks its insulin-producing pancreatic cells.
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Let’s see,

It is crucial to acknowledge Diabetes T1 is linked to a predisposing genetic factor, then something in your environment triggers it. In a nutshell, this means the disease can be inherited and connected to your family history and genetics, but environmental and immunological risk factors also play a role. 

Let’s sum up some basic info; we are aware Diabetes T1 is a chronic condition that results from the pancreas’s lack or total absence of insulin production and usually occurs in childhood and adolescence, although adult cases are plenty. And so, bear in mind Insulin is a hormone that regulates blood sugar and allows glucose to enter the body’s cells to provide energy.  
 
When we talk about genetics in Diabetes, if you have the genetic marker that makes you susceptible to Diabetes T1, these genes provide instructions for making proteins that play a critical role in the immune system. Its normal function is to identify foreign substances that enter the body and defend it from them. However, in Type 1 Diabetes, this function is altered. 
 
As a result, the antigens cannot recognize their cells, which produces an “immunological error,” where the immune system attacks its insulin-producing pancreatic cells.
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A genetic marker is a DNA sequence with a known physical location on a chromosome. Genetic markers can help link an inherited disease with the responsible gene.
 
The genetic marker is essential for type 1 diabetes to manifest; however, it requires interaction with environmental factors and immunological alterations to be activated. 
 
Hence the importance of seeing the following seven most recognized risk factors for type 1 diabetes in medicine:
1. Family health history:
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It is very likely to have Diabetes type 1 when Diabetes runs in your family. If any family member, such as your parents and or siblings, has been diagnosed, there is a high chance you could get Diabetes yourself.
 
For example, suppose both parents have or had the disease. In that case, the higher risk for the child developing diabetes type 1. Additionally, given observations from studies related to Diabetes type 1, the risk of developing the disease is slightly higher in kids if the father rather than the mother has type 1 Diabetes.
2. Gender and Age:
Type 1 diabetes can manifest at any age; however, it usually appears at two critical times. The first occurs in child populations between 4 and 7 years old and the second between 10 and 14 years.
 
Studies also show a more significant number of cases of Type 1 Diabetes in the male population over the age of 15. However, under the age of 20, the SEARCH study describes a more significant presence of type 1 diabetes in women in the USA.
 
On the other hand, it has been described that girls develop type 1 Diabetes 3 years earlier than boys, which has been related to the fact that women present hormonal changes earlier than men, at puberty.
 
It is important to mention that although these are all data references, variations will show depending on the population data where the study is taking place.
3. Race/ethnicity:
Diabetes type 1 diagnosed rates vary among different races. In addition, certain ethnicities have a higher risk of developing the disease. However, according to the regions and climates, there are significant differences within the same race.
 
For example, in the United States, Caucasians seem to be more susceptible to type 1 than African-Americans and Hispanic-Americans. 
 
In general, non-Hispanic whites assemble the racial group with the highest incidence of type 1 diabetes, followed by non-Hispanic Blacks.
 
White-Hispanic Americans and Asian Americans show a lower risk for developing cardiovascular complications of Diabetes compared to NHWs (Non-Hispanic White).
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4. Geography and weather:
The incidence of type 1 diabetes is higher in the temperate regions and declines progressively towards the equator.
 
Statistics indicate that people who live in seasonal climates show a higher risk of developing type 1 diabetes, more frequently during the winter. The harsh climatic conditions of these populations make people spend more time together in closed spaces, increasing the chances of viral infections. As we’ll see in the next risk factor, viruses predispose the immune system contributing to a certain extent to the development of type 1 diabetes.
 
Likewise, the assimilation of vitamin D during winter is also a critical factor due to the absence of sunlight; this affects some pregnant mothers, increasing the chance of babies’ risk of being born with this diabetic condition. 
 
On the contrary, people who live in tropical warmer climates, such as South America, spend less time in closed spaces during the year due to their climatic conditions; consequently, they’re less likely to develop type 1 diabetes.
5. Viral infections:
Researchers have discovered there’s a connection between viruses and Diabetes Type 1. Those particular viruses affect the immune system triggering a cascade of molecular events that leads to the modification of the genome; this alters the identity and function of the pancreatic cells responsible for the production and secretion of Insulin. As we said earlier, Insulin is the hormone that lowers blood glucose levels.
 
We can name German measles, also known as rubella, Coxsackievirus, and Mumps, between the viral infections where these viruses can be found.
 
Hence the importance of awareness in preventive measures against contagious diseases, from the mildest ones such as the flu to others of greater severity, especially at very early ages. 
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6. Early diet:
There is a substantial effort in literature and studies that have been actively investigating the role of infant and childhood diet in type 1 diabetes.
 
Most of these studies continue to give inexact results, making it inconsistent to give specific dietary recommendations for early childhood. 
 
However, the most conclusive results between early feeding and type 1 diabetes denote the beneficial effects of breastfeeding and the risky outcomes of early exposure to cow’s milk, gluten, or sweets in general. 
7. Other autoimmune alterations:
As explained above, type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that causes the body not to recognize its pancreatic cells and attack them.
 
Diseases such as Multiple Sclerosis, Graves’ Disease, and Pernicious Anemia have similar behavior to the “genetic marker” typical of Diabetes type 1. Therefore, developing any of these diseases may increase the chances of developing type 1 diabetes in a person with a genetic predisposition.
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We’ve covered all 7 Risk Factors to help you identify T1 diabetes early.
 
Staying informed is a way to take action to avoid or delay the onset of this disease if there are risk factors in your personal history. 
 
The proactive attitude in health leads to preventive medicine and a prioritized healthy lifestyle.
 
At Diabetes Consciousness, we stand for you to know and do better for yourself and your loved ones. 
 
Therefore sharing Maya Angelou’s quote: “Do the best you can until you know better. Then when you know better, do better.”
 
 
Healthy helping stands in our Mission!

 

Thanks!
⚠️ What is your risk? 👉🏻 In this video, you’ll learn that T1 Diabetes is related to a predisposing genetic factor inherited and related to family history, but there are Risk Factors Diabetes Type1, including environmental and immunological factors that play a determining role in its manifestation.
 
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The genetic marker is essential for type 1 diabetes to manifest; however, it requires interaction with environmental factors and immunological alterations to be activated. 
 
Hence the importance of seeing the following 7 most recognized risk factors for type 1 diabetes in medicine: 
 
1️⃣ Family health history: If any family member, such as your parents and or siblings, has been diagnosed, there is a high chance you could get Diabetes yourself.
 
2️⃣ Gender and Age: Type 1 diabetes can manifest at any age; however, it usually appears at two critical times.
 
3️⃣  Race-ethnicity: Caucasians seem to be more susceptible to type 1
 
4️⃣ Geography and weather: The incidence of type 1 diabetes is higher in the temperate regions and declines progressively towards the equator.
 
5️⃣  Viral infections: Those particular viruses affect the immune system triggering a cascade of molecular events that leads to the modification of the genome.
 
6️⃣  Early diet: There’s a substantial effort in literature and studies that have been actively investigating the role of infant and childhood diet in type 1 diabetes.
 
7️⃣  Other autoimmune alterations: Diseases such as Multiple Sclerosis, Graves’ Disease, and Pernicious Anemia have similar behavior to the “genetic marker” typical of Diabetes type 1
 
 
 
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 21 tips you should know to live a full and healthy life with diabetes.

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